Members of Actors’ Equity File Lawsuit Against Their Union

LOS ANGELES (Oct. 17, 2015) — Actors and other members of the Los Angeles theatrical community filed a lawsuit today against Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers. The lawsuit challenges the Union’s decision to eliminate its 25-year-old waiver of jurisdiction over small 99-seat theaters, a program popularly known as Equity Waiver. Plaintiffs claim that the Union’s decision to end Equity Waiver will unfairly destroy small theater in Los Angeles and deprive thousands of actors of opportunities to collaborate on creative theatrical projects.

The lawsuit was filed in the Los Angeles federal court. The plaintiffs are Los Angeles-based members of Equity, together with other theatrical artists and theater operators who had entered into a litigation Settlement Agreement with the Union in 1989 that established a system for regulating future changes to the Equity Waiver program.

The lawsuit allegesEquityLogo.jpg.644x600_q100 that the stage actors’ union violated this Settlement Agreement by improperly interfering with the democratic and due process procedures established in the Agreement to prevent any unilateral Union decision to eliminate the world of intimate theater. The lawsuit complains that Equity’s new rules, including a prohibition on volunteer acting at small theaters and a new wage compensation obligation on these theaters, will force theaters to close, reduce their production runs, or to hire non-union volunteer actors in place of Union actors.

The plaintiffs announced that they would not serve the Complaint on the Union immediately, in the hope that the Union would respond to their request to meet and confer about a mutually acceptable resolution of the small theater controversy.

“Although we have now filed the complaint, we have not yet served it on the Union,” stated Steven Kaplan, lead attorney for the plaintiffs. “We have asked the Union to take this opportunity to avoid the time, expense and acrimony of litigation, and sit down with its members to discuss a mutually advantageous resolution.”

Michael A Sheppard

Michael A Sheppard

Gary Grossman, a member of Equity and one of the plaintiffs in the 1989 litigation, stated that “This lawsuit became necessary because Equity refused to comply with the preliminary procedural protections built into our 1989 Settlement Agreement. These procedural protections were designed to ensure that, before substantial changes were made to the 99-Seat Theater Plan, meaningful discussions would take place within the small theater community.”

Actor Michael A. Shepperd, also a plaintiff, said, “Our members voted to reject the Union’s actions by a 2-1 margin in one of the largest election turnouts in the organization’s history. We are terribly disappointed that our Union rejected the principle of democracy on which it was founded, and foisted on Union members new rules that will harm all actors in the long run.”

Karen Kondazian

Karen Kondazian

Actress Karen Kondazian, another plaintiff, explained that “the majority of Los Angeles artists who work in small theaters want Equity to put a moratorium on these new plans in order for local members’ voices to be adequately and fairly heard, and for the Union to work together with a task force of local theater artists to develop a comprehensive plan that will adequately address the needs of the Los Angeles theater community. But our leadership turned a deaf ear to our concerns.”

Actor French Stewart, another plaintiff, lamented that “we would hate to see either the death of intimate theater or the world of small theater go non-union. Equity’s decision was short-sighted and likely will contribute to an erosion of unionized acting in Los Angeles.”

Plaintiffs are represented by the Law Offices of Steven J. Kaplan and Martha Doty of Alston & Bird.

Celebrity Verdict – Twenty Years Later

An Interview with David McMillan, writer of WATCHING O.J. – a World Premiere at Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA – Opening October 3rd.

A double murder case, it unfolded like a Hollywood movie. It was October 3, 1995. Everybody remembers where they were on that day, when the verdict was announced. In the wide cross-section of L.A.’s diverse population, tensions ran high as people awaited, and watched.

Twenty years to the day, David McMillan’s new play returns to the scene with a passionate, multi-racial perspective on that crucial moment. As the play’s characters patronize their local cleaners and neighboring businesses, a volatile discussion about race and social class bubbles to the surface, one that is more relevant now than ever.

Playwright, David McMillan

Playwright, David McMillan

David McMillan is a Los Angeles playwright, screenwriter, and filmmaker. His writing credits include Fox’s “Sleepy Hollow,” the upcoming Fox show “Lucifer,” and a new pilot that he’s developing with producer Will Packer for NBC. David has received several awards for his work, including USC’s top prize for screenwriting.  Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA presents the World Premiere of “Watching O.J.” which is opening exactly 20 years to the day of the criminal trial verdict.

Hollywood Revealed: Why did the O.J. Simpson double murder trial have such a lasting impression on you?

David: As black teenager, growing up in Inglewood, I was fascinated by how people were watching the trial, through their own distinct racial, cultural, and historical lens. It wasn’t so much the events as it was everybody’s perception of the events. Even now, “the facts” of the case are often beside the point — what’s illuminating is how we look at those facts.

 Kareem Ferguson (as Jamal) and Robert Gossett (as Oz)

Kareem Ferguson (as Jamal) and Robert Gossett (as Oz)

Hollywood Revealed: Is your new play fictional or sort of a recap of your experience at the time?

David: The locale and characters are fictional, however they’re very much based on people I know, and some of my own experiences. I vividly remember the trial, the emotions it stirred, the conversations it provoked. So while it’s not “autobiographical,” the play is very much a creative snapshot of my memories of that time. That said, people who know me will say that they can see a few of my family members in some of the characters (glimpses of my mom and dad in particular). I won’t try to deny it — some influences you just can’t escape.

Hollywood Revealed: Will you talk about the process of getting this play started, and if it is a common way that you work.

Angela Bullock (as Cordia) and Lisa Renee Pitts (as Kim)

Angela Bullock (as Cordia) and Lisa Renee Pitts (as Kim)

David: Honestly, every project starts out differently. Sometimes it’s a character, sometime it’s a situation/set-up, and sometimes it’s an idea. For “Watching O.J.” it was really the idea that first inspired me. I liked the idea of using the O.J. trial as a dramatic backdrop/catalyst for exploring racial tensions in America. I didn’t have any of the characters at that point — I discovered those later (or maybe I should say, they discovered me). It’s a messy process — and to be honest, I wish it were less messy. I wish I could just come up with a premise, outline it from beginning to end, write it, and then voila — the play is finished. But I’ve come to learn that creativity, and writing a play in particular, is a lot more complicated than that. You write, you re-write, you get feedback, you re-think, and then you write and write and re-write some more. And eventually, if you’re lucky, the world gets to see it.

Hollywood Revealed: Exactly 20 years from the announcement of the criminal trial verdict, your play opens. Was that the plan from the start?

David: Wish I could say yes, but it’s really more like a confluence of happy accidents. The script was ready, and we were able to assemble an extraordinary cast that was available, and Keith Szarabajka, the director, was between television projects. So it worked out great, beyond what anyone could have hoped for.

Lisa Renee Pitts (as Kim), Angela Bullock (as Cordia), Tony Pasqualini (as Harold), and Kelly Wolf (as Sheila)

Lisa Renee Pitts (as Kim), Angela Bullock (as Cordia), Tony Pasqualini (as Harold), and Kelly Wolf (as Sheila)

Watching O.J. opens on Saturday, October 3rd and runs at 8pm Fridays and Saturdays, 2pm Sundays, through November 8, 2015. Post show talk backs are scheduled throughout the run with special guests. Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA is located in the Atwater Village Theatre complex 3269 Casitas Ave. LA, CA 90039. Tickets: $19.95 at 818-858-0440 or watchingoj.brownpapertickets.com  

The cast includes Lisa Renee Pitts (Straight Outta Compton – as Dre’s mom), Robert Gossett (Broadway Fences, A Raisin in the Sun, and The Last Minstrel Show. Currently in the TNT’s Major Crimes as Chief Taylor reprising the role he created in The Closer), Angela Bullock, Kareem Ferguson, Robert Gossett, Tony Pasqualini, Tarah Pollock, Eve Sigall, Roy Vongtama, and Kelly Wolf.

Photos by:Hope Burleigh

‘Pro99’ Actors’ Equity Members Send Open Letter to AEA President Kate Shindle

LOS ANGELES (Aug. 27, 2015)

Members of the “Pro99” movement of Actors’ Equity Association have issued an open letter to AEA’s newly elected president, Kate Shindle, in response to her victory and to her inaugural address as president of the national union for actors and stage managers.

The open letter is signed by over 400 Equity members (listed below), including such notable names as Ed Asner, Francis Fisher, Sally Kirkland and Alfred Molina.

AEA President Kate Shindle

AEA President Kate Shindle

The “Pro99” movement formed in late 2014 in opposition to AEA’s rollout of a new plan that will effectively force “intimate theaters” in Los Angeles to pay Equity actors minimum wage, go “non-union” or even close – despite an overwhelming vote against the plan by 66% of the Los Angeles membership on an advisory referendum. “Pro99” members around the nation, who take their name from the current AEA “99 Seat Plan” that allows members to volunteer in smaller venues, oppose AEA’s new promulgated plan. They are requesting that Equity leadership put a moratorium on the plan until local members’ voices can be heard, and that the union work with its members to develop an alternative plan that will more realistically address the needs of the Los Angeles theater community.

The Letter reads:

Dear President Shindle,

We, the undersigned members of AEA who support the Pro99 movement, both in the L.A. area and around the nation, congratulate you on your win, and wish you a successful term as President of our beloved union. We were satisfied that our passionate campaigning helped to elect you, and appreciated that during your campaign you came to Los Angeles to meet with us and express your interest in the 99- Seat debacle that has galvanized our Los Angeles Theatre Community.

In your “Inaugural Column” in the July/August 2015 edition of Equity News you wrote: “Everyone has a different definition of what’s cool; to me, the coolest thing Equity can do is to encourage its members to be passionate, vocal activists and ambassadors. Because that will not only make our industry more successful, it will also make our union stronger.”

We couldn’t agree more. We are also encouraged and grateful that you mention our cause in your column, especially since we do not feel we have always been fairly represented in Equity News and emails — that is, when we’ve been represented at all. Thank you for your willingness to both meet with us and publicly discuss what absolutely continues to be a crisis in our union. As you noted, we do have much to celebrate about intimate theatre in L.A. — almost thirty years of rich and creative work under the guidelines endorsed by our own union.

However, we’re concerned about your mention of a recent Fringe Festival production that was produced under the proposed “New 99-Seat Theatre Agreement.” Though you present it as something to perhaps celebrate, we wish to be clear that that Agreement is precisely what an overwhelming majority of local AEA members voted against in the advisory referendum (66%: a landslide). As you can imagine, LA members don’t consider this an event to celebrate. We think it is, in fact, the problem, and not the solution. Worse, we think the way the new agreement was promulgated by the union is even more problematic for the democratic process. We have found the actions and messaging of the leadership of our union troubling, and the fact that the leadership ignored the will of its own membership is deeply disturbing. Worst of all, we firmly believe this new plan will effectively destroy our vibrant theatrical community.

We love our union. We have, from the beginning, offered to work with Council and staff to find a solution that will not only address our concerns, but also make our union stronger and respectful of local members’ needs. We welcome turning a new page with your support and willingness to listen to us articulate the realities of our community in order to resolve this crisis.

In solidarity,
Members of AEA
#PRO99 movement

Photo by:Joe Marzullo

Actors Go Rogue For 2015 Nude Calender

Los Angeles, CA:  January 6, 2015

Trust the Rogue Machine Theatre in Los Angeles, producers of edgy, provocative plays such as Mike Bartlett’s award winning, “Cock” and the world premier of L.R. Gordon’s “Uploaded”Image 2 to come up with a sexy way to raise money for their up-coming 2015 season.   They’ve gone rogue and have just released a new calender featuring nude photos of cast members from Rogue Machine’s various productions.  And it isn’t just cheese and beefcake.  Testing the notion that brains and brawn sells, the Bard Laid Bare Calendar features notable death and battle scenes from Shakespeare’s greatest plays as portrayed by associates of this innovative theater company.

It seems most of the actors had no qualms about stripping for the camera.

“I’m not a huge fan of taking my clothes off for strangers. In fact, this is a first,” stated Justin Okin who portrays Brutus from Julius Caesar.  “I did this because Rogue Machine has shown me time and time

again that diving off the edgeImage 1 without knowing what is on the other side is truly the most ambitious and rewarding way to tell stories.”

And Burt Grinstead who recreated Hamlet for the photo shoot say he agreed to get naked because, in his words, “what better way to make it in Hollywood than to show a little skin.”

No doubt Grinstead isn’t the first to come up with that concept.

Proceeds from the sale of the calendar will go to support the Rogue Machine Theatre, primarily to purchase new light and sound equipment.

Participants of "The Bard Laid Bare" Calendar from Rogue Machine

Participants of “The Bard Laid Bare” Calendar from Rogue Machine

Considering the fine quality of Rogue Machine’s productions the selling price of $20.00 is more than a worthwhile investment.

You can order your copy of the Bard Laid Bare Calendar HERE or pick one up at the theater which is located at: 5041 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90019

Calendar Photos by: Jeff Lorch

 

 

21st SAG Award Nominees Announced

Hollywood, CA:December 10, 2014

Eva Longoria and Ansel Elgort announced the nominees for the 21st annual Screen Actors Guild Awards on TBS and TNT.  The film, “Birdman” got the most nominations with four nods, while “The Imitation Game” and “The Theory of Everything” landed three apiece. Those three, plus “The Grand Budapest Hotel” and “Boyhood” are finalists in the movie ensemble category.

Michael Keaton and Edward Norton in "Birdman"

Michael Keaton and Edward Norton in “Birdman”

Predictably, “Modern Family” grabbed four nominations, and “Homeland,” “Game of Thrones,” “House of Cards” and “Boardwalk Empire” each received three.

Here is the complete list of nominations:

Theatrical Motion Pictures

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
STEVE CARELL / John du Pont – “FOXCATCHER” (Sony Pictures Classics)
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Alan Turing – “THE IMITATION GAME” (The Weinstein Company)
JAKE GYLLENHAAL / Louis Bloom – “NIGHTCRAWLER” (Open Road Films)
MICHAEL KEATON / Riggan – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
EDDIE REDMAYNE / Stephen Hawking – “THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING” (Focus Features)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
JENNIFER ANISTON / Claire Bennett – “CAKE” (Cinelou Films)
FELICITY JONES / Jane Hawking – “THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING” (Focus Features)
JULIANNE MOORE / Alice Howland-Jones – “STILL ALICE” (Sony Pictures Classics)
ROSAMUND PIKE / Amy Dunne – “GONE GIRL” (20th Century Fox)
REESE WITHERSPOON / Cheryl Strayed – “WILD” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
ROBERT DUVALL / Joseph Palmer – “THE JUDGE” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
ETHAN HAWKE / Mason, Sr. – “BOYHOOD” (IFC Films)
EDWARD NORTON / Mike – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
MARK RUFFALO / Dave Schultz – “FOXCATCHER” (Sony Pictures Classics)
J.K. SIMMONS / Fletcher – “WHIPLASH” (Sony Pictures Classics)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
PATRICIA ARQUETTE / Olivia – “BOYHOOD” (IFC Films)
KEIRA KNIGHTLEY / Joan Clarke – “THE IMITATION GAME” (The Weinstein Company)
EMMA STONE / Sam – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
MERYL STREEP / The Witch – “INTO THE WOODS” (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
NAOMI WATTS / Daka – “ST. VINCENT” (The Weinstein Company)

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
BIRDMAN (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
ZACH GALIFIANAKIS / Jake
MICHAEL KEATON / Riggan
EDWARD NORTON / Mike
ANDREA RISEBOROUGH / Laura
AMY RYAN / Sylvia
EMMA STONE / Sam
NAOMI WATTS / Lesley

BOYHOOD (IFC Films)
PATRICIA ARQUETTE / Olivia
ELLAR COLTRANE / Mason
ETHAN HAWKE / Mason, Sr.
LORELEI LINKLATER / Samantha

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES)
F. MURRAY ABRAHAM / Mr. Moustafa
MATHIEU AMALRIC / Serge X.
ADRIEN BRODY / Dmitri
WILLEM DAFOE / Jopling
RALPH FIENNES / M. Gustave
JEFF GOLDBLUM / Dep. Kovacs
HARVEY KEITEL / Ludwig
JUDE LAW / Young Writer
BILL MURRAY / M. Ivan
EDWARD NORTON / Henckels
TONY REVOLORI / Zero
SAOIRSE RONAN / Agatha
JASON SCHWARTZMAN / M. Jean
LÉA SEYDOUX / Clotilde
TILDA SWINTON / Madame D
TOM WILKINSON / Author
OWEN WILSON / M. Chuck

THE IMITATION GAME (The Weinstein Company)
MATTHEW BEARD / Peter Hilton
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Alan Turing
CHARLES DANCE / Commander Denniston
MATTHEW GOODE / Hugh Alexander
RORY KINNEAR / Nock
KEIRA KNIGHTLEY / Joan Clarke
ALLEN LEECH / John Cairncross
MARK STRONG / Stewart Menzies

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING (Focus Features)
CHARLIE COX / Jonathan Hellyer Jones
FELICITY JONES / Jane Hawking
SIMON McBURNEY / Frank Hawking
EDDIE REDMAYNE / Stephen Hawking
DAVID THEWLIS / Dennis Sciama
EMILY WATSON / Beryl Wilde

Television Programs

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
ADRIEN BRODY / Harry Houdini  – “HOUDINI” (History)
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Sherlock Holmes – “SHERLOCK: HIS LAST VOW” (PBS)
RICHARD JENKINS / Henry Kitteridge – “OLIVE KITTERIDGE” (HBO)
MARK RUFFALO / Ned Weeks – “THE NORMAL HEART” (HBO)
BILLY BOB THORNTON / Lorne Malvo – “FARGO” (FX)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
ELLEN BURSTYN / Olivia Foxworth – “FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC” (Lifetime)
MAGGIE GYLLENHAAL / Nessa Stein – “THE HONORABLE WOMAN” (Sundance TV)
FRANCES McDORMAND / Olive Kitteridge – “OLIVE KITTERIDGE” (HBO)
JULIA ROBERTS / Dr. Emma Brookner – “THE NORMAL HEART” (HBO)
CICELY TYSON / Carrie Watts – “THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL” (Lifetime)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
STEVE BUSCEMI / Enoch “Nucky” Thompson – “BOARDWALK EMPIRE” (HBO)
PETER DINKLAGE / Tyrion Lannister – “GAME OF THRONES” (HBO)
WOODY HARRELSON / Martin Hart – “TRUE DETECTIVE” (HBO)
MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY / Rust Cohle – “TRUE DETECTIVE” (HBO)
KEVIN SPACEY / Francis Underwood – “HOUSE OF CARDS” (Netflix)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series (6 nominees)
CLAIRE DANES / Carrie Mathison – “HOMELAND” (Showtime)
VIOLA DAVIS / Annalise Keating – “HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER” (ABC)
JULIANNA MARGULIES / Alicia Florrick – “THE GOOD WIFE” (CBS)
TATIANA MASLANY / Sarah/Coxima/Alison/Rachel/ – “ORPHAN BLACK” (BBC America)
Helena/Tony/Jennifer and Various Others
MAGGIE SMITH / Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham – “DOWNTON ABBEY” (PBS)
ROBIN WRIGHT / Claire Underwood – “HOUSE OF CARDS” (Netflix)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
TY BURRELL / Phil Dunphy – “MODERN FAMILY ” (ABC)
LOUIS C.K. / Louie – “LOUIE” (FX)
WILLIAM H. MACY / Frank Gallagher – “SHAMELESS” (Showtime)
JIM PARSONS / Sheldon Cooper – “THE BIG BANG THEORY” (CBS)
ERIC STONESTREET / Cameron Tucker – “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
UZO ADUBA / Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren – “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” (Netflix)
JULIE BOWEN / Claire Dunphy – “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)
EDIE FALCO / Jackie Peyton – “NURSE JACKIE” (Showtime)
JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS / Vice President Selina Meyer – “VEEP” (HBO)
AMY POEHLER / Leslie Knope – “PARKS AND RECREATION” (NBC)

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series

BOARDWALK EMPIRE (HBO)
STEVE BUSCEMI / Enoch “Nucky” Thompson
PAUL CALDERON / Arquimedes
NICHOLAS CALHOUN / Sean
LOUIS CANCELMI / Mike D’Angelo
JOHN ELLISON CONLEE / Commodore
MICHAEL COUNTRYMAN / Frank Wilson
STEPHEN GRAHAM / Al Capone
DOMENICK LOMBARDOZZI / Ralph Capone
NOLAN LYONS / Enoch Thompson (young)
KELLY MACDONALD / Margaret Thompson
BORIS McGIVER / Sheriff Smith Johnson
VINCENT PIAZZA / Charlie “Lucky” Luciano
PAUL SPARKS / Mickey Doyle
TRAVIS TOPE / Joe Hardy
SHEA WHIGHAM / Eli Thompson
ANATOL YUSEF / Meyer Lansky
MICHAEL ZEGEN / Benny Siegel

DOWNTON ABBEY (PBS)
HUGH BONNEVILLE / Robert, Earl of Grantham
LAURA CARMICHAEL / Lady Edith Crawley
JIM CARTER / Mr. Carson
BRENDAN COYLE / Mr. Bates
MICHELLE DOCKERY / Lady Mary Crawley
KEVIN DOYLE /  Mr. Molesley
JOANNE FROGGATT / Anna Bates
LILY JAMES / Lady Rose
ROBERT JAMES-COLLIER / Thomas Barrow
ALLEN LEECH / Tom Branson
PHYLLIS LOGAN / Mrs. Hughes
ELIZABETH McGOVERN / Cora, Countess of Grantham
SOPHIE McSHERA / Daisy
MATT MILNE / Alfred
LESLEY NICOL / Mrs. Patmore
DAVID ROBB / Dr. Clarkson
MAGGIE SMITH / Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham
ED SPELEERS / Jimmy Kent
CARA THEOBOLD / Ivy
PENELOPE WILTON / Isobel Crawley

GAME OF THRONES (HBO)
JOSEF ALTIN / Pyp
JACOB ANDERSON / Grey Worm
JOHN BRADLEY / Samwell Tarly
DOMINIC CARTER / Janos Slynt
GWENDOLINE CHRISTIE / Brienne of Tarth
EMILIA CLARKE / Daenerys Targaryen
NIKOLAJ COSTER-WALDAU / Jaime Lannister
BEN CROMPTON / Dolorous Edd
CHARLES DANCE / Tywin Lannister
PETER DINKLAGE / Tyrion Lannister
NATALIE DORMER / Margaery Tyrell
NATHALIE EMMANUEL / Missandei
IAIN GLEN / Ser Jorah Mormont
JULIAN GLOVER / Pycelle
KIT HARINGTON / Jon Snow
LENA HEADEY / Cersei Lannister
CONLETH HILL / Varys
RORY McCANN / Sandor “The Hound” Clegane
IAN McELHINNEY / Ser Barristan Selmy
PEDRO PASCAL / Oberyn Martell
DANIEL PORTMAN / Podrick Payne
MARK STANLEY / Grenn
SOPHIE TURNER / Sansa Stark
MAISIE WILLIAMS / Arya Stark

HOMELAND (Showtime)
NUMAN ACAR / Hassan Haqqani
NAZANIN BONIADI / Fara Sherazi
CLAIRE DANES / Carrie Mathison
RUPERT FRIEND / Peter Quinn
RAZA JAFFREY / Aasar Khan
NIMRAT KAUR / Tasneem Qureishi
TRACY LETTS / Sen. Andrew Lockhart
MARK MOSES / Dennis Boyd
MICHAEL O’KEEFE / John Redmond
MANDY PATINKIN / Saul Berenson
LAILA ROBINS / Martha Boyd
MAURY STERLING / Max

HOUSE OF CARDS (Netflix)
MAHERSHALA ALI / Remy Danton
JAYNE ATKINSON / Catherine Durant
RACHEL BROSNAHAN / Rachel Posner
DEREK CECIL / Seth Grayson
NATHAN DARROW / Edward Meechum
MICHEL GILL / President Walker
JOANNA GOING / Tricia Walker
SAKINA JAFFREY / Linda Vasquez
MICHAEL KELLY / Doug Stamper
MOZHAN MARNÃ’ / Ayla Sayyad
GERALD McRANEY / Raymond Tusk
MOLLY PARKER / Jackie Sharp
JIMMI SIMPSON / Gavin Orsay
KEVIN SPACEY / Francis Underwood
ROBIN WRIGHT / Claire Underwood

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series

THE BIG BANG THEORY (CBS)
MAYIM BIALIK / Amy Farrah Fowler
KALEY CUOCO-SWEETING / Penny
JOHNNY GALECKI / Leonard Hofstadter
SIMON HELBERG / Howard Wolowitz
KUNAL NAYYAR / Rajesh Koothrappali
JIM PARSONS / Sheldon Cooper
MELISSA RAUCH / Bernadette Rostenkowski-Wolowitz 

BROOKLYN NINE-NINE (FOX)
STEPHANIE BEATRIZ /  Det. Rosa Diaz
DIRK BLOCKER / Hitchcock
ANDRE BRAUGHER / Capt. Ray Holt
TERRY CREWS / Sgt. Terry Jeffords
MELISSA FUMERO / Det. Amy Santiago
JOE LO TRUGLIO / Det. Charles Boyle
JOEL McKINNON MILLER / Scully
CHELSEA PERETTI / Gina Linetti
ANDY SAMBERG / Det. Jake Peralta

MODERN FAMILY (ABC)
AUBREY ANDERSON EMMONS / Lily Tucker-Pritchett
JULIE BOWEN / Claire Dunphy
TY BURRELL / Phil Dunphy
JESSE TYLER FERGUSON / Mitchell Pritchett
NOLAN GOULD / Luke Dunphy
SARAH HYLAND / Haley Dunphy
ED O’NEILL / Jay Pritchett
RICO RODRIGUEZ / Manny Delgado
ERIC STONESTREET / Cameron Tucker
SOFIA VERGARA / Gloria Delgado-Pritchett
ARIEL WINTER / Alex Dunphy

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK (NETFLIX)
UZO ADUBA / Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren
JASON BIGGS / Larry Bloom
DANIELLE BROOKS / Tasha “Taystee” Jefferson
LAVERNE COX / Sophia Burset
JACKIE CRUZ / Flaca
CATHERINE CURTIN / Wanda Bell
LEA DELARIA / Carrie “Big Boo” Black
BETH FOWLER / Sister Ingalls
YVETTE FREEMAN / Irma
GERMAR TERRELL GARDNER / Charles Ford
KIMIKO GLENN / Brook Soso
ANNIE GOLDEN / Norma Romano
DIANE GUERRERO / Maritza Ramos
MICHAEL J. HARNEY / Ofc. Sam Healy
VICKY JEUDY / Janae Watson
JULIE LAKE / Angie Rice
LAUREN LAPKUS / Susan Fischer
SELENIS LEYVA / Gloria Mendoza
NATASHA LYONNE / Nicky Nichols
TARYN MANNING / Tiffany “Pennsatucky” Doggett
JOEL MARSH GARLAND / Scott O’Neill
MATT McGORRY / Ofc. John Bennett
ADRIENNE C. MOORE / Black Cindy
KATE MULGREW /  Galina “Red” Reznikov
EMMA MYLES / Leanne Taylor
JESSICA PIMENTEL / Maria Ruiz
DASCHA POLANCO / Dayanara Diaz
ALYSIA REINER / Natalie “Fig” Figueroa
JUDITH ROBERTS / Taslitz
ELIZABETH RODRIGUEZ / Aleida Diaz
BARBARA ROSENBLAT / Miss Rosa
NICK SANDOW / Joe Caputo
ABIGAIL SAVAGE / Gina
TAYLOR SCHILLING / Piper Chapman
CONSTANCE SHULMAN / Yoga Jones
DALE SOULES / Frieda
YAEL STONE / Lorna Morello
LORRAINE TOUSSAINT / Yvonne “Vee” Parker
LIN TUCCI / Anita DeMarco
SAMIRA WILEY / Poussey Washington

VEEP (HBO)
SUFE BRADSHAW / Sue Wilson
ANNA CHLUMSKY / Amy Brookheimer
GARY COLE / Kent Davidson
KEVIN DUNN / Ben Cafferty
TONY HALE / Gary Walsh
JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS / Vice President Selina Meyer
REID SCOTT / Dan Egan
TIMOTHY SIMONS / Jonah Ryan
MATT WALSH / Mike McLintock

SAG Awards for Stunt Ensembles

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
“FURY” (Columbia Pictures)
“GET ON UP” (Universal Pictures)
“THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
“UNBROKEN” (Universal Pictures)
“X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST” (20th Century Fox)

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series (6 nominees)
“24: LIVE ANOTHER DAY” (FOX)
“BOARDWALK EMPIRE” (HBO)
“GAME OF THRONES” (HBO)
“HOMELAND” (Showtime)
“SONS OF ANARCHY” (FX)
“THE WALKING DEAD” (AMC)

Screen Actors Guild 51st Annual Life Achievement Award
DEBBIE REYNOLDS

The SAG Awards will air live on Sunday, Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. ET.

2014 American Film Market Wraps in Santa Monica

Wednesday 12th November – The 2014 American Film Market (AFM®) wrapped its 35th edition today after 7,946 attendees visited the Loews Hotel in Santa Monica for the eight day market.

The AFM again was host to a truly global market, with 1,670 buyers coming from over 70 different countries.  Overall exhibitor attendance was up 1% from last year with 2,825 executives from exhibiting companies from over 40 countries, with the largest number of exhibitors coming from the IMG_4489United Kingdom, France and Japan, after the USA.

Overall industry attendees, the non-buyers and sellers that include Attorneys, Bankers, Festivals, Film Commissions, Filmmakers, Financiers, Post Production Facilities, Producers, Studio Facilities, and Writers finished at 2,624, up 1% from last year’s numbers.

The AFM also hosts a large segment of independent writers, producers, directors and wannabes of all ages.  Many of the faces haunting the lobby of the Loews Hotel have been attending the event for decades while many are just starting out.

Spotted at the AFM wasIMG_4271 this young man, Alexander Saffaie and his mother, producer, Michelle Alexandria. “With the film business being so youth oriented these days, you can’t wait to get in the game,” she explained with a smile as she and her baby, Alexander hurried to another power meeting.

This year’s AFM screened 432 films with 352 Market Premieres, 85 World Premieres and a total of 654 screenings across the AFM Campus in Santa Monica.

The popular five-day AFM Conference Series showcasing sessions on Financing, Pitching, Production, Marketing and Distribution featured global industry leaders including: Brett Ratner (producer), Cassian Elwes (Independent Producer), Tobin Ambrust (Exclusive), Mark Damon (Foresight Unlimited), Mark Gill (Millennium), Rena Ronson (UTA), Emanuel Nunez (Paradigm), Russell Schwartz (Relativity), John Sloss (Cinetic), and Nicolas Gonda (Tugg). The AFM IMG_4492Conference Series, which launched four years ago, hosted international audiences of more than 700 daily.

The 2014 Roundtables and Conversations featured notable industry elites including Wei Han (Bliss Media), filmmaker and comedian Adam Carolla, Meyer Schwarzstein (Brainstorm Media), Caroline Stern (Kaleidoscope Film Distribution), and many more.

Crowdfunding and Crowd-Investing as Viable Sources of Financing Startups and Movie-Making

by Alan von Kalckreuth

The Alternative Funding Forum, a one-day mega-fest of insight and networking is taking place on November 21st at the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles.

For me this is all part of the new world of film entertainment, because change is a-coming, ready or not!  At a committee meeting in 2008 I was amused to realize we were prepping to bring on board a RED camera… the very same day the Hollywood Reporter (once owned by my good friend Bill Miles and his wife Tichi Wilkerson) was reporting that Lionsgate was pulling outVictoria 07 of its independent film track.  Here we were sitting around the board table marveling at how inexpensively we could make independent films and reading that the last avenue for conventional distribution had just jumped the rails.  And so began my years of gathering – gathering knowledge and insight into alternatives business opportunities, not only to fund movies, but to be a part of this remarkable digital revolution that is expanding like those red blooms at sea.

Digital platforms, multi screen viewing, smart phone, tablets… for me the next few years was consumed with learning alternative markets, alternative strategies, alternative paradigms etc.  The word “content” was now the buzzword, describing what the prolific digital market was thirsting after.  I knew that back in the day, sadly before I got involved in filmmaking here in Hollywood, there was development money.  Bill Miles would tell me sweet stories of pitching an idea to a studio and getting good funds to develop a script.  Those days are gone, but humans are resourceful creatures and so the search for alternative funding and the new digital ecosystem resulted in new funding concepts, new rules and new regulations.

I reached out to Victoria Silchenko, Ph.D. founder of the Alternative Funding Forum, to get a better overview of how finance models are expanding to keep abreast of the red tide of technology.

A: What is the single most significant change in start-up business financing in the past ten years?

V: Just a few years ago, if you decided to get on an entrepreneurial path and were bold enough to drop out of college or the corporate word to pursue your dream, your initial financing options were limited to maxing out credit cards, borrowing against your home (if you had one) and asking your friends and family for loans. So called ‘angel investors’ – accredited investors with a level of wealth and income fitting the criteria imposed by the Security and Exchange Commission (which would allow them to invest into private companies), were hard to get reach. The transactions costs were high since you would have to deal with a middleman.  But now we are living at the best time to raise capital as startups have a broad range of visible funding opportunities like never before with much easier access to alternative financing thanks to emerging online platforms.

A:  What exactly has happened?

V:  First of all, most recently the world has been disrupted by the phenomena called crowdfunding which exposures entrepreneurs to a huge audience of potential backers and which fundamentally has evolved into two basic forms: rewards based crowdfunding (with market leaders such as KickStarter and Indiegogo) and equity based crowdfunding (or crowdinvesting).

Crowdinvesting disrupts traditional angel investing here in the US, it means now you can “meet” angel investors online instead of chasing them at golf clubs or private events. There are numerous operating websites where you can raise capital in exchange for your company equity or profit-share arrangements: such as AngelList.com, EarlyShares, CircleUp, Crowdunder, InvestedIn, etc.  While crowdinvesting is a relatively new and complex phenomena, you also have other options.

A:  Why do you believe the Millennium entrepreneur has any chance of success in a global market that has seen multi-national corporations vacuum up opposition/competition as anti-trust regulation has been dismantled to meaningless copper wire and rusty siding?

V:  The undisputable rule of going global used to be that only once you achieved a handsome level of revenue and scalability would you begin to look into the possibility of expansion overseas. Now as the barriers to international commerce continue to shrink and payments can be made worldwide, it is no wonder that young entrepreneurs are starting to think how to acquire customers from China, Brazil or Russia right from the very beginning.

Of course a huge amount of a preparation work should be done: language settings are crucial to making international customers comfortable, cultural features should be taken into consideration and it is important to realize that patents and trademark creation is something that would require additional time and capital. By the way, I am on the board of an innovative global company that provides capital for global expansion, TradeUp Capital – check it out.

A:  If there were one piece of advice you could give to a young developer –who has already leveraged his/her parents, uncles and family friends- what would it be?

V:  That’s easy. Book a ticket for our Nov 21st forum at LA’s Century Plaza Hotel where you will learn all about alternative funding options and meet investors – saving on months of networking.

A:  Does crowd funding have a viable win-win structure for funders and fundeee?

V: Well, at the end of 2014, crowdfunding is estimated to provide over $65 billion to the global economy and as of today it is the most rapidly growing industry. When you talk about equity based crowdfunding, the risks are high for capital providers – just like they are high for any angel investor in a more traditional setting. And the level of risk depends really on which stage of funding a startup is at.  It is generally believed that for startups raising their first round of capital (seed/series A financing) the failure rate is at least 90%, while for more mature and developed startups raising a second round of capital (series B financing) a failure rate drops to a 50%.

But as risks are high so are the rewards and some of the especially opportunistic investors might want to find another Amazon which turned the investment of $1,000 into staggering $239,000 15 years later.

A:  Has the advances in technology that allow start-ups to get to proof of concept quicker and cheaper helped or hindered the access to real funding?

Market validation and proof of concept are the two most important benefits of crowdfunding beyond getting the actual capital. In fact, once when a client and I were pitching his business to one of the investors, he asked if we tried KickStarter to see what the demand is. I am figuring that for a lot of angel investors, VCs and even potential buyers the money raised on KickStarter is becoming a score based on which they can make an investment decision. Remember the story with Oculus Rift, a company that had been crowdfunded by KickStarter’s backers who donated a striking $2 million? The rest was a history when right after that, Facebook acquired Oculus Rift for $2 Billion.

As a side note – the saddest part is that backers did not capitalize on the exit event since KickStarter is a donation/reward-based platform. The only way to profit from a company liquidity event is by investing via equity crowdfunding platform such opportunity is limited right now to the accredited investors only. I truly believe equity crowdfunding for unaccredited investors (aka everyday investors) would be a huge step towards engaging the broader community in the investing process and broadening capital access to early stage entrepreneurs.

A:  Has Hollywood recognized the opportunities alternative funding has to offer independent filmmakers and content producers?

B:  Hollywood has been one of the first to take advantage of the reward based crowdfunding model, killing two birds with one stone -raising practically free money from the audience, while identifying a potential demand and unleashing a fan base before the movie is even made. From a producing point of view, I think it is really a genius idea to engage the audience with the exciting process of movie-making.

The important thing for independent producers to remember is that crowdfunding is not an easy process. When Veronica Mars producers attracted over 91,000 backers who pledged $5.7 million overcompensating a requested $2 million goal (which was achieved in 10 hours), you should keep in mind that it is due to having an established show and an existing fan base.

For an independent producer my suggested math would be the following – if you have 2,000 followers on FB or Twitter, you might want to assume that at least 10% would back you. Statistically, the average donation is $70 per backer, so with 2,000 followers you might count on just a $14,000 donation. So the rule is – start your crowdfunding campaign before starting the process of actual crowdfunding and build your following and a social media profile at least six months in advance.

I believe that studios will eventually  recognize the value of crowdfunded films, but we also should keep in mind that the main blockbusters cost $100 million and more to make – and with the existing record of $5.7 million it will probably take some time before we see the first crowdfunded blockbusters made. So if an independent producer has an opportunity to negotiate a fair deal with a studio I would not throw this opportunity away by relying on crowdfunding only.

One more thing, film makers should really know the difference between reward based crowdfunding and equity based crowdfunding. The last one involves sale of securities to investors, and those who invest are also entitled to receive a financial interest in the project. The problem for an independent movie maker to raise capital on an equity crowdfunding platform is that over 90% of Hollywood made movies fail to turn a profit – and the most profitable movies are movies that are made by studios with over $100 million budget.

A:  Are investors using new paradigms or just repackaging old models for investment and recouping?

V:  The biggest trend in the investment community is that the screening of investment opportunities is transitioning from off-line to on-line. For example, if you register on AngelList as an investor, you would be amazed by how many projects – good projects – are offered, and you can click on them while sitting in the comfort of your cozy home. Nevertheless, once the project is chosen, it is the same routine of due diligence, meeting with the founders face to face, valuing the company, negotiating the equity stake and calculating your own risks and rewards while evaluating whether a new project would add any value to your existing portfolio.

A:  What do you expect the next big funding trend to be?

V:  I am a big believer in necessity of further development of equity crowdfunding based on Title III of the JOBS Act which would allow small businesses and startups (including entertainment projects) to raise up to $1 million annually in equity from everyday “mom-and-pop” investors, not just accredited investors. Unfortunately, the SEC has missed the deadline for this and it is unclear whether it will issue the final rules later this year – or will move forward with the rules at all.

One of the biggest achievements of the JOBS Act is that startups are allowed to solicit money from the accredited investors publicly – via advertising and social media. So, I am wondering if soon the famous billboards of LA will be overwhelmed with advertising messages like “Invest in my movie instead of “Go see my movie!”

Victoria Silchenko, Ph.D. produces the Alternative Funding Forum happening in Los Angeles this November 21st.  Be there and leap ahead, or miss the event and get back to gate crashing events at the golf club. For details and tickets visit www.metropoleglobal.com

Hollywood’s Silicon Beach

by Alan von Kalckreuth

Hollywood: June 30, 2014

Silicon Beach Fest just wrapped down by the pier in Santa Monica.  It’s the way the world should be, brilliant ideas, movie glamor and the pacific winds cooling the hopeful under the shade of palm trees.

The SBF is in its third year and was well attended making it clear to business developers, theSiliconBeach City of Los Angeles, the movie studios and the keen observer that technology is moving fast and smartphone users, tablet users and traditional computer users are fertile ground certain to provide bountiful harvests for shrewd seeders.

The impact digital technology is having on consumer behavior is obvious, the less obvious matter however is how do you deliver content and information and make money doing it.

Does Hollywood have a role to play in this new eco-system? According to Daniel Ornstein, Warner Brothers’ Home Entertainment front man, all the studios are primed with digital divisions and these divisions “spend a lot of time and energy not looking at the obvious ways of doing things, but in innovative ways”.  He gave the example of dealing with DVD distribution and returns as a drain on funds that disappear as soon as you introduce downloads.  And it is start-ups and outside sources that fuel this “reinventing” of delivery, access and marketing of WB content he declared.

“We work with accelerators with more than just money and advice,” he explained, but didn’t elaborate.  Instead he revealed one of the significant benefits to the WB, “Soft benefits –our “spend” time with people who think completely different than our people.”

Maria Pacheco, DreamWorks Animation, Sr. Director Marketing (Mobile) told the techies in attendance, “At Dream Works there are six of us and sometimes we get a little crazy, we are charged with internal education.”  This theme of the studio juggernauts lumbering through the new digital ecosystem wishing they could navigate the unpredictable landscape as nimbly as skateboards is one of the primary reasons that start-ups should reassure their parents, their “investor” uncles and their angel investors that they are in with a chance –not only do they ride skateboard, but they are not hampered by mega-systems that react with sloth-like slowness.

“We’re finally getting everyone on the same page,” Pacheco stated with a triumphant exhaling.  She cited their success with How to Fly Your Dragon, but revealed that it took al their muscle to get behind that one app.

Ornstein suggests start–up get shrewd about navigating the studio system, “Find the right department to approach,” he advises, “not the highest caliber person on LinkIn.”  Pacheco adds, “Have a strong 15 second elevator pitch”.  She explains that she gets hundreds of calls and e-mails every day, “if they don’t catch me in the first couple of seconds I’m on to the next.”

The possibility of techies finding traditional money to pursue their app dreams was slapped down… gently… by Steve Shapiro, City National Bank, Senior Vice President – Entertainment Division.  “We are looking for a person who has done well in a previous company and puts their name on the line (read: has the money to back the loan and signs it away along with children, all personal water crafts and expensive jewelry), or if a studio is backing them a purchase order, same as film financing.”  Shapiro did apologize for being dressed like a banker not a skateboarder, but made no apologies for being a banker.  “How are you going to pay us back?” was pretty much his embossed reverse side of his business card.

Shapiro did suggest a traditional model that he believes translates to techie start-ups, “Packaging, get a celebrity behind it –we’ll get involved based on the strength of the celebrity.”  Most of the attendees quickly scrolled through their iPhones and sighed.

 

 

 

IFTA Members Take Home 10 Oscars

Los Angeles, CA – March 3, 2014

Members of the Independent Film & Televisions Alliance (IFTA®) again produced and distributed the most critically acclaimed films of the year for 2013, as Member films captured ten Oscars® at the 2014 Academy Awards®, earning top honors in feature movies-oscars-2014-press-room-spike-jonzecategories including Best Picture, Actor in a Leading Role, Actress in a Leading Role, Original Screenplay and Adapted Screenplay.

This marks the 11th time in the past 12 years that the Oscar® for “Best Picture” has gone to an  IFTA Member film, as 12 Years A Slave (2014) joins The Artist (2012), The King’s Speech (2011) and The Hurt Locker (2010) among recent winners.  Below is the full list of Academy Award-winning IFTA Member films from this year’s ceremony:
(*Please note, companies listed are IFTA Member Companies involved in the film,)

Best Picture
12 Years A Slave (Lionsgate/Summit Entertainment)

Actor in a Leading Role
Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club (Focus Features, Voltage Pictures)

Actress in a Leading Role
Cate Blanchett – Blue Jasmine (Focus Features)

Original Screenplay
Spike Jonze – Her (Panorama Media)

Adapted Screenplay
John Ridley – 12 Years A Slave (Lionsgate/Summit Entertainment)

Actor in a Supporting Role
Jared Leto – Dallas Buyers Club (Focus Features, Voltage Pictures)

Actress in a Supporting Role
Lupita Nyong’o – 12 Years A Slave (Lionsgate/Summit Entertainment)

Documentary Feature
20 Feet from Stardom (The Weinstein Company)

Foreign Language Film
The Great Beauty – Italy (Pathe International)

Makeup and Hairstyling
Adruitha Lee & Robin Mathews – Dallas Buyers Club (Focus Features, Voltage Pictures)

For more information about IFTA, contact Sunshine/Sachs

The Highs and Lows of 2014’s Academy Award Telecast

Hollywood: March 3, 2014

One of the best Academy Award presentations of recent memory, last night’s show was not without some “what the F moments.”

Among the most jaw dropping segments started with host Ellen DeGeneres’ opening monologue where she proclaimed that “the night was going to end one of two ways. “Possibility No. 1, 12 Years a Slave wins best picture.” “Possibility No. 2, you’re all racist.”  Really, Ellen?

She carried on by takingIMG_3765 jabs at “Captain Phillips” co-star, Bakhad Abdi, actress, Jennifer Lawrence and actor, Jonah Hill.

The line however may have been crossed when she singled out Liza Minnelli who squirmed in her seat after DeGeneres proclaimed, “There is one of the most amazing Liza Minnelli impersonators I’ve ever seen in my entire life,” she said, pointing out the actress sitting in the audience next to sister Lorna Luft.  “Good job, sir,” said DeGeneres who herself is famous for wearing men’s suits.

Jennifer Lawrence’s comment to someone in the audience, asking “why are you laughing?  What, is this funny? I’m still watching you!” seemed odd and out of place.  It may have been an inside joke but it fell flat.

Then there was once beautiful Kim Novak’s drastic face job that left the room asking WTF.

Some presenters fumbled and embarrassed themselves, most notably John Travolta who had two words to pronounce, a name, Idina Menzel and could not get that right.  He introduced  the Broadway star as Adela Dazeem.  It makes you wonder how some people get to be presentersIMG_3769 on the Academy Awards and why.  Case in point is Harrison Ford whose gruff, pissed off persona is getting to be a real bore.

Thankfully the great moments outweighed the bad.

The selfie Ellen took with a room full of stars, the pizza she had delivered to audience members and then asking the crowd to chip in made for great spontaneous television. 

Jarod Leto’s speech was powerful and moving.  Spike Jones winning for his great screenplay, “Her” was gratifying, but it was Lupita Nyong’o acceptance speech  and “12 Years a Slave” winning best picture brought the award season to a highly gratifying end.

Here is a full list of all the winners last night:

Best Supporting Actor:

Barkhad Abdi, Captain Phillips
Bradley Cooper, American Hustle
Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave
Jonah Hill, The Wolf of Wall Street
WINNER: Jared Leto, Dallas Buyers Club

Best Costume Design:

Michael Wilkinson, American Hustle
William Chang Suk Ping, The Grandmaster
WINNER: Catherine Martin, The Great Gatsby
Michael O’Connor, The Invisible Woman
Patricia Norris, 12 Years a Slave

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:

WINNERS: Adruitha Lee and Robin Mathews, Dallas Buyers Club
Stephen Prouty, Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa
Joel Harlow and Gloria Pasqua-Casny, The Lone Ranger

Best Short Film (animated)

Feral
Get a Horse!
WINNER: Mr Hublot
Possessions
Room on the Broom

Best Animation:

The Croods
Despicable Me 2
Ernest and Celestine
WINNER: Frozen
The Wind Rises

Best Visual Effects:

WINNER: Gravity
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Iron Man 3
The Lone Ranger
Star Trek Into Darkness

Best Short:

Aquel No Era Yo (That Wasn’t Me)
Avant Que De Tout Perdre (Just before Losing Everything)
WINNER: Helium
Pitääkö Mun Kaikki Hoitaa? (Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?)
The Voorman Problem

Best Documentary:

CaveDigger
Facing Fear
Karama Has No Walls
WINNER: The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life
Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall

Best Documentary:

The Act of Killing
Cutie and the Boxer
Dirty Wars
The Square
WINNER: 20 Feet from Stardom

Best Foreign Film:

Broken Circle Breakdown (Belgium)
WINNER: The Great Beauty (Italy)
The Hunt (Denmark)
The Missing Picture (Cambodia)
Omar (Palestine)

Best Sound Mixing:

Captain Phillips
WINNER: Gravity
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Inside Llewyn Davis
Lone Survivor

Best Sound Editing:

All Is Lost
Captain Phillips
WINNER: Gravity
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Lone Survivor

Best Supporting Actress:

Sally Hawkins, Blue Jasmine
Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle
WINNER: Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave
Julia Roberts, August: Osage County
June Squibb, Nebraska

Best Cinematography:

Philippe Le Sourd, The Grandmaster
WINNER: Emmanuel Lubezki, Gravity
Bruno Delbonnel, Inside Llewyn Davis
Phedon Papamichael, Nebraska
Roger A Deakins, Prisoners

Best Editing:

American Hustle
Captain Phillips
Dallas Buyers Club
WINNER: Gravity
12 Years a Slave

Best Production Design:

American Hustle
Gravity
WINNER: Catherine Martin, Beverley Dunn, The Great Gatsby
Her
12 Years a Slave

Best Original Score:

John Williams, The Book Thief
WINNER: Steven Price, Gravity
William Butler and Owen Pallett, Her
Alexandre Desplat, Philomena
Thomas Newman, Saving Mr Banks

Best Original Song:

Alone Yet Not Alone, Alone Yet Not Alone [disqualified]
Happy, Despicable Me 2
WINNER: Let It Go, Frozen
The Moon Song, Her
Ordinary Love, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Best Adapted Screenplay:

Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke, Before Midnight
Billy Ray, Captain Phillips
Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope, Philomena
WINNER: John Ridley, 12 Years a Slave
Terence Winter, The Wolf of Wall Street

Best Original Screenplay:

Eric Warren Singer and David O Russell, American Hustle
Woody Allen, Blue Jasmine
Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack, Dallas Buyers Club
WINNER: Spike Jonze, Her
Bob Nelson, Nebraska

Best Director:

David O Russell, American Hustle
WINNER: Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity
Alexander Payne, Nebraska
Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave
Martin Scorsese, The Wolf of Wall Street

Best Actress:

Amy Adams, American Hustle
WINNER: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
Sandra Bullock, Gravity
Judi Dench, Philomena
Meryl Streep, August: Osage County

Best Actor:

Christian Bale, American Hustle
Bruce Dern, Nebraska
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Wolf of Wall Street
Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave
WINNER: Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club

Best Picture:

WINNER: 12 Years a Slave
American Hustle
Captain Phillips
Dallas Buyers Club
Gravity
Her
Nebraska
Philomena
The Wolf of Wall Street