The Boys Are Back In Town

Review by: Peter Foldy

Jersey Boys, the jukebox musical that opened last week at the Center Theatre Group/Ahmanson Theatre is like a visit with your colorful, occasionally chaotic relatives. It’s great to see them once in a while, catch up on old stories and reminisce–but it’s also hard to ignore the fact that they are getting a bit older – perhaps slowing down a little. Despite that, you realize you love them just the same. The fun you have with them always leaves you with warm and fuzzy memories.

That certainly holds true with the current production starring Mark Ballas, (reprising his Broadway performance) as Frankie Valli. Joining him are Matthew Dailey (Tommy DeVito), Keith Hines (Nick Massi) and Cory Jeacoma (Bob Gaudio) as his bandmates. Four young guys who discovered a musical sound nobody had ever quite heard before. For those who don’t know the story, the Four Season’s harmonies were perfect on stage while off stage it was quite a different situation.  Their connection to a criminal element, their failed relationships inside and outside the quartet, and particularly Tommy DeVito’s irresponsible handling of the group’s finances eventually lead to a breakup, handing Frankie Valli a hard fought for but ultimately a successful solo career.

With a book by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice and directed by Des McAnuff, Jersey Boys is fast-paced episodic storytelling. It covers a significant segment of the quartet’s lives, from their early years to their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

It takes close to forty minutes before their first big hit song, “Sherry,” is performed but from that point on, the hits here just keep on coming, and that’s what really make the show so much fun. Songs such as “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Oh What A Night,” “Walk Like A Man,” “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” and “Working My Way Back To You” have the audience clapping and singing along. You are almost guaranteed to leave with a smile on your face.

While Ballas works hard to bring Frankie to life it is clear that the demands on him as a vocalist are daunting. It is no wonder that Aaron De Jesus and Miguel Jarquin-Moreland also portray Frankie at certain performances during the week. On opening night you could hear Ballas strain a little by the second act but it was a strain many probably wouldn’t notice or care about. Truth be told he is charming Frankie Valli.

Cast mate, Matthey Daily brings a strong presence as “Tommy DeVitto,” Keith Heines nails the comedy as Nick Massi and Cory Jeacoma is likable as the sensible and talented songwriter, “Bob Gaudio.”

The ensemble of “Jersey Boys” includes Mark Edwards, Corey Greenan, Bryan Hindle, David LaMarr, Austin Owen, Kristen Paulicelli, Leslie Rochette, Andrew Russell, Jenna Nicole Schoen, Dru Serkes, Jonny Wexler and Jesse WildmanJesse Wildman.

The production maintains the slickness that was a signature of the Broadway production. The use of on-stage video intercut with shots of Ed Sullivan and audiences from the 60s enjoying the Four Seasons are a great touch and the introduction of the real life Frankie Valli at the curtain call was a very special moment on opening night. His presence brought the house down.

Whatever minor shortcomings the show may have, it is undeniable that Jersey Boys is a phenomenal worldwide hit and this touring production guarantees a good time.

When: Through June 24, 2017.
Ahmanson Theatre
Tuesday through Friday at 8 p.m.
Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m.
Sunday at 1 and 6:30 p.m.
No performance on Mondays.
Exceptions: Added performances on Thursday, June 22 at 2 p.m.
Ticket: $25 – $130
(Ticket prices are subject to change.)
Tickets are available Online at www.CenterTheatreGroup.org
or by calling Center Theatre Group Audience Services at
213.972.4400
In person at the Center Theatre Group box office at The Music Center
Group Sales:
213.972.7231
Deaf community
information and charge: visit CenterTheatreGroup.org/ACCESS.
Center Theatre Group/ Ahmanson Theatre
At the Music Center, 135 N. Grand Avenue in Downtown L.A. 90012.
Photos by: Jim Carmody
 

 

 

Melodramatic “Kiss” Is a Conversation Starter

Review by: Peter Foldy

What starts out as a soap opera about star-crossed lovers soon does an about-face and turns dark and sinister in Guillermo Calderon‘s KISS, making it’s West Coast Premiere at the Oddysey Theatre in West L.A.

Directed by Bart DeLorenzo and performed by Kristin Couture, Max Lloyd-Jones, Kevin Matthew Reyes, Natali Anna, Nagham Wehbe and Cynthia Yelle, (a group of talented actors) Kiss turns out to be a play about a play.

It is hard to delve into the details without giving away too much and spoiling the experience for future audiences, but I can tell you that Kiss starts out comedic and becomes a dark, fluid story that is sprinkled with hidden meaning. It examines human resilience and highlights the suffering of people caught in unimaginable circumstances.

Kiss however also walks a fine line between it’s intended melodrama and it’s surprising plot twists and it’s these unexpected revelations that causes the play to ultimately wear out some of it’s welcome.  If it weren’t for it’s fine cast who help smooth the credibility gaps with their commitment, Kiss might be a far less thought proving piece of theater.

Nina Caussa’s impressive scenic design certainly helps us visualize the story as it unfolds, as does Katelan Braymer’s lighting design. Both of these artists help to transition this drama from laid back suburbia to violent war zone.

Regardless of it’s credibility gaps, Kiss provokes and stimulates conversation. It reminds us how lucky we are to live in a relatively trouble free environment where plays such as this can be staged without fear of repercussion. Go see it with an open mind and enjoy the ride.

When: May 5 through June 18 on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Additional weeknight performances are scheduled on Wednesday, May 17; Thursday, May 25; and Wednesday, June 7, all at 8 p.m.

Where: The Odyssey Theatre is located at 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West Los Angeles, 90025. For reservations and information, call (310) 477-2055 or go to OdysseyTheatre.com.

Tickets: $34 on Saturdays and Sundays; $30 on Fridays; and $25 on Wednesdays and Thursdays, with discounted tickets available for students and members of SAG/AFTRA/AEA.

There will be two “Tix for $10” performances on Friday, May 5 and Friday, May 26. The third Friday of every month is wine night at the Odyssey: enjoy complimentary wine and snacks and mingle with the cast after the show.

Photos by: Enci Box

 

 

Farrugut North at The Odyssey Theatre Feels Current and Compelling

Review by: Peter Foldy

As decency and dignity continues to get shredded in our current political climate Farragut North by Beau Willimon, creator of Netflix’s “House of Cards,” gives us a revealing look behind the curtain and lets us observe the puppet masters who mold the image of our political candidates and elected officials. It’s easy to think Jarred Kushner or Steve Bannon while watching this new guest production at the Odyssey Theatre in West Los Angeles, directed by Cathy Linder.

Stephen Bellamy (Jack Tynan ) is a likable though morally deficient young go getter who is press secretary for a Democratic candidate with an eye on the White House. Though only 25, Stephen’s road to success is almost a certainty. He is handsome, cocky and willing to sacrifice in order to succeed.

His boss, campaign manager Paul Zara (Geoffrey Lower) grooms Stephen to follow in his footsteps. The younger man learns fast, but when he receives a job offer from the competition, he takes a misstep which sucks him into a world of confusion and betrayal that might quickly kills his dreams and could possibly end his career. One white lie, one omission is all it takes to set the sordid wheels in motion.

A taut, plot twisting study in trust and loyalty, Farrugut North is full of emotional and sexual intrigue as we witness these charismatic people get caught up in a world of unbridled ambition and back-door politics.

Jack Tynan confidently portrays Stephen Bellamy. With his good looks, sharp communication skills and political savvy, Tynan makes it easy for us to believe that Bellamy cannot fail.

The rest of the cast, Jennifer Cannon, Adam Faison, Margaret Fegan and Francisco J. Rodriguez, are all solid in their roles – but kudos especially go out to Geoffrey Lower as Paul Zara and Andy Umberger as Tom Duffy, the campaign manager for the opposing candidate.

Farrugut North is compelling theater that is perhaps more relevant in today’s world than when it was first created. This slick production does the story proud.

When: 8pm Fridays and Saturdays, 2pm Sundays through May 21, 2017 (no performance Friday, April 21st or Sunday, April 16th).

Where: The Odyssey Theatre, 2055 South Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90025.

Tickets: $30. Available HERE or by calling (323) 960-7788.

Parking available onsite for a fee or free street parking.

 

 

 

Australian Theatre Company Seeks Full-Length Plays For Annual Reading Series

LOS ANGELES (March 28, 2017) — L.A.’s award-winning Australian Theatre Company is inviting submissions of full-length plays to be presented by a professional director and cast as part of its 2017 Summer Reading Series, scheduled to take place this June at the Zephyr Theatre. This year’s theme is “United on Stage,” a celebration of inclusivity and diversity that reflects the cultural melting pot that is both America and Australia today.

ATC welcomes new and previously produced works by both established and emerging writers of any nationality. Although an Australian voice should be present in each piece, that voice could be represented by the writer, a character, the location or an overarching theme.

The Summer Reading Series is part of ATC’s development process for future productions. Previous themes have included “Stage to Screen” (great plays that have inspired films) and “Works by Women” (plays by Australian female writers presented on the U.S. stage for the first time). Last season’s main stage productions of Speaking In Tongues and Ruben Guthrie were both developed in the reading series.

This annual community event is also a way for ATC to connect with local and international writers, actors, and other theater practitioners, and to develop new audiences – all while enjoying some great Australian wine, courtesy of Penfolds. The readings will take place every Monday in June at 7 p.m at the Zephyr Theatre, 7456 Melrose Avenue, and are presented by the Australian Consulate General of Los Angeles. Admission is always free.

ATC was established in 2014 by founding members Nick Hardcastle, Nate Jones, Jackie Diamond and Josh Thorburn. Critically acclaimed productions have included Holding the Man, Speaking in Tongues and Ruben Guthrie. A truly collaborative company, ATC continues to harness the rich breadth of Australian talent in Los Angeles along with the finest American practitioners, creating a meaningful cultural exchange.

For more information and to submit a play for consideration, contact literary manager Leah Patterson at literary@australiantheatrecompany.org.

“The Gun” – A Play Review

by Peter Foldy

An unhappily married couple and their lay-about friend engage in a power struggle over commitment and motivation in the world premier of “The Gun” by JUSTIN YOFFE now playing at the Ruskin Group Theatre in Santa Monica.

“Steve” (JOSH DRENNEN) is a troubled actor unable to climb out of his soul crushing rut. His friend, “Mike” (JOHN COLELLA) seems to take pleasure in reminding Steve that his career is in the dumps, that his life is going nowhere. An in your face, cocky know it all; Mike’s life appears to be no picnic either. His marriage to his fragile wife, “Ellen” (AUSTIN HIGHSMITH GARCES) is shaky at best. Ellen is completely under his thumb and Mike doesn’t comprehend just how demoralizing his tone is when he talks to her. Mike is a nasty piece of work and Steven and Ellen have both just about had it with him.

After blowing a promising Broadway audition, Steve storms out of the casting director’s office feeling even more of a failure. Finding himself in an alley he discovers an abandoned hand gun in a garbage can. A homeless man, (HAMILTON MATTHEWS) tells Steve he saw someone dump it there. Unfazed, Mike keeps the gun and suddenly feels empowered. Is this the catalyst he needs to step up to the plate? To rise to the occasion and realize his potential?

Returning to Mike’s apartment with the weapon in his waistband,  Steve confronts Ellen. He questions her and Mike’s relationship and tells her he sees the way her husband treats her. Knows how unhappy she must be.

Ellen opens up to Steve and when Mike returns from work he finds his friend and his wife in an embrace. Confused and feeling threatened, he confronts Steve. What starts out as a verbal challenge soon turns nasty and physical. Mike is revealed to be even more messed up then Steve. He eventually gets a hold of the gun and from here the play rapidly spirals toward its climactic conclusion.

Hindered by a monologue-heavy piece of writing the actors dig deep and manage to bring this conflicted story to life.

Josh Drennen commands the stage as the troubled “Steve.” John Colella is suitably overbearing and delivers a nuanced performance as Steve’s best friend. Austin Highsmith Garces is suitably empathetic as “Ellen,” her character’s turmoil as sad as it is relatable.

Using the unconventional stage at the Ruskin Theatre to her advantage, set designer, HILLARY BAUMAN, smoothly transitions the story between it’s various setting.  Composer, HANNAH FLOREK, helps create just the right mood with her fine score, while Director, DAVE FLOREK, keeps the the tension of The Gun wound tight, presenting a compelling psychodrama that is tough, to the point and ultimately well worth the price of admission.

When: 8pm Fridays and Saturdays, 2pm on Sundays through April 30, 2017
(No performances April 14-16, or on April 29th)

Where: Ruskin Group Theatre. 3000 Airport Avenue, Santa Monica, CA 90405

Tickets: $25 ($20 for students, seniors, and guild members) and can be purchased in advance by calling (310) 397-3244 or online at www.ruskingrouptheatre.com

Ample free parking available on site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rogue Machine Launches Season 10

Los Angeles, CA – (February 3, 2017)

Multi-award winning ROGUE MACHINE THEATRE (Best Production Award winner 2013, 2011 and 2010 – Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle, Ovation) is back for a new season in Los Angeles beginning March 4, 2017.

SEASON TEN main stage offerings will begin with the West Coast Premiere of Still Life directed by Michael Peretzian and opening at 8:30pm on March 4th. Broadway playwright and Academy Award winner Alexander Dinelaris (Birdman; On Your Feet) examines the causal link between life and death, ethics and success, art and redemption. How do we endure loss and re-find the will to make something of our lives? Performance will be at 8:30pm Saturdays and Mondays, 3pm on Sundays through April 23rd. Tickets are $40 at and can be reserved at http://www.roguemachinetheatre.com. For more information call 855-585-5185.

Founding Artistic Director of Rogue Machine, John Perrin Flynn

Lorraine Hansberry’s Les Blancs, directed by Gregg Daniels, will make its Los Angeles Premiere in late May. Hansberry considered this her most important play – This lost masterpiece had a celebrated revival by The National Theatre in 2016. A tale of exploding colonial tensions and lost fathers, Les Blancs reveals the impossible moral choices faced by individuals who must reconcile personal happiness with idealism. What happens when what we want and what we think is right is not what must be done?

Daytona by Oliver Cotton, directed by Elina DeSantos, opens late September r, an American Premiere. Witty and alternately haunting, Daytona is a love story about three people who find themselves in crisis when the long-buried past returns to disturb the fragile lives they have constructed to survive. How do we forgive ourselves, and others, while living with what we have done?

I’m Gonna Pray for You So Hard by Halley Feiffer, opens in late spring. This West Coast Premiere is a dark, exhilaratingly toxic and very funny, new play. It pulls the audience into the middle of a deeply complicated relationship and sheds a disturbing new light on the eternal struggles of parents and children to find common ground in a world where success and greed are the cultures touch points. Is it a winner-take-all world?

Bled for the Household Truth by Ruth Fowler, directed by Cameron Watson, will open in the Fall. A World Premiere, Fowler is a radical writer who first came to media attention after writing several articles for The Village Voice as “Mimi.” She chronicled her life as a stripper in Manhattan while attempting to obtain a work visa. Bled is a study of modern alienation, about how difficult it has become for young Americans to trust in a broken cynical world that both forces and promotes “Me first.” Will compassion no longer redeem us?
Rogue Machine is located at The Met, 1089 N Oxford Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90029. Reservations: 855-585-5185 or at http://www.roguemachinetheatre.com

Ticketing information will be announced shortly, and will be available by visiting http://www.roguemachinetheatre.com

 

American Legion Presents “Everything In Between”

On Veteran’s Day, the American Legion Hollywood Post 43, Liberty Theater presented the world premiere of Everything In Between, in their Historic Cultural Monument Building at 2035 N. Highland Avenue.

The story deals with four generations of vets, brought together by chance, collaborateEIB_p013 to help a young man returning home from Afghanistan. “Lance Porter” is haunted by the experiences that followed him back, and changed life as knew it. When his search for solace leads him to another bar, the cynical patrons threaten to lead him further down the rabbit hole.

“I have always had a story in my head about different generations of Veterans, from all branches of the military, coming together to help one another heal. It’s about the human condition that we all share and the specific condition that veterans share, along with the hope that things are somehow going to get better,” explains REBECCA STAHL; Playwright/MD

The play’s director, JOHN DiFUSCO is the recipient of a New York Drama Desk Award as well as a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle, LA Weekly, NAACP Theatre, Drama-Logue, Robby, and Valley Theatre League Award. He began his professional career at the Odyssey Theatre with credits such as Peer Gynt, The Kid, The Caucasion Chalk Circle, The Balcony, and Mother Courage.

John created and directed the landmark Vietnam play Tracers, which premiered at OTE. He directed the Tania Verafield and Jaimyon Parker2New York Premiere at The Public Theater, where it was published as one of “The Ten Best of 85/86.” He has toured extensively and internationally with Tracers, which continues to be produced around the world. Locally, he has directed numerous plays including Hair, White People, Avenue X, Joan and the Zulus, Just A Song at Twilight, Will Strip for Food, Ali, and Rounds. John received the USAF Commendation Medal for Meritorious Service in Vietnam.

The American Legion was formed in 1919 to give all veterans a place to congregate together in fellowship as well as memorial. The Hollywood post raised funds with the help of Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Ida Lupino Clark Gable, Rudolph Valentino, Clara Bow, Mary Pickford, and the Marx Brothers who attended their boxing matches along side blue-collar patrons. The building described as “military in character and a dignified solution to the problem of combining a memorial and a clubhouse,” by the Los Angeles Times was opened on July 4, 1929.

“We came back from Vietnam alone. The term PTSD was developed from our experience and this often created barriers between us and our fathers and uncles who had served in WWII. We were labeled drug addicts, losers, and crybabies. Rebecca Stahl captures today’s Vet World where these gaps are non-existent. This is what attracted me to the play. In spite of any personalJ. Kenneth Campbell, Jaimyon Parker, and Campbell De Silva emotional baggage, older Veterans seeing a need and taking action,” says director John DiFusco; Vietnam Veteran

Produced by the community veterans’ organization, Hollywood Post 43 of the American Legion, Liberty Theater. The cast, crew, and design team includes U.S. military veterans.

The ensemble includes; Jaimyon Parker, Karl Risinger, J, Kenneth Campbell, Rachel Boller, CampbellDe Silva, Caron Strong, Tania Verafield, Fred Hirz and Johnny D.

Everything In Between runs 8pm Fridays and Saturdays, and 3pm on Sundays through December 4, 2016 (no performance on November 25th).

Hollywood American Legion Post 43, Liberty Theater at 2035 N. Highland Avenue, Hollywood, CA. Tickets $25 (Military and veterans $10).

Free parking onsite. For information and reservations: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2709880

Lost Girls – A Powerful Film Proves Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction

by Peter Foldy

On October 28th this year, 18 days ago, the FBI rescued 82 children from a ring of sex traffickers in Columbus, Ohio. Stories like this, while not uncommon in the news, seem to quickly slip from public consciousness. There is a pervading opinion that this is not something that happens in the United States. While we all agree that human trafficking is appalling, we do not see it as a problem13 year old kidnapped girl Beth (Tori Griffith)(1) in our suburbs. After all, it’s 2016.

Many think this is a problem in South Asia, Thailand or the Philippines, where sex tourism is a major industry. We may know that is a problem in certain disreputable massage parlors in Amsterdam or the bars in Belarus. JULIA VERDIN’S haunting film, LOST GIRLS, paints a bleak picture of underage sex slaves here in the United States and reminds us that human trafficking is also an American problem.

In Verdin’s film we meet a young girl, “Marisol,” who is lured from her home in a quiet California suburb and tricked into befriending her eventual captors. She is put in a cage, given drugs to numb her, and then sold to countless men, some old enough to be her father or grandfather.

How could this happen in a first world Trafficking recruiters Kara (Bar Paly) and Greg (Will Brandt)(1)country and a major city like LA? It’s mainly about the money. Human trafficking is a lucrative business. As Verdin states, “these criminals can sell a gram of coke, or heroin, or a gun once, they can sell a young girl thousands and thousands of times.”

According to statistics, sex trafficking is most prevalent in California, Texas and Florida. It has become “society’s most pervasive crisis” according to UNICEF. By 2020 they expect sex trafficking to overtake drugs and weapons in magnitude.

“Lost Girls” could not have come at a better time. “The recruiters are getting more aggressive, now sending people into schools and targeting malls and places whereKara (Bar Paly) having an insight of her past kids hang out” Verdin tells us. “I think people have this perception that it is a third world problem and it’s really not. London, New York and LA are three of the larger cities where this goes on. What’s changed in sex trafficking business is that they are not just going after kids who have run away from home. Kids are  also being targeted in their own homes or online.”

“When filming a story that deals with sexual abuse,” says Verdin, “it’s vital to balance voyeurism and subtlety. A filmmaker must avoid making prostitution titillating; she must avoid contributing to the already enormous feat of teen girls and girlish qualities in adult women. It’s the filmmaker’s duty to look the issue in the eyes. She must3544696(1) not gloss over the issue and try to make sexual abuse family-friendly.”

In “Lost Girls” Verdin balances the subject delicately and deftly, making scenes that would normally border on gratuitous, nuanced. She understands the need to open a serious conversation about this issue without exploiting it, a pitfall many films have teetered on the brink of.

Instead, Julia Verdin delivers a film that’s 23.50 minutes of tension, tossing every scene at us, unblinking and moving along right before we put our hands over our eyes.

We need more films like this to remind us of important issues such as this to spread awareness and prompt action

“Lost Girls” is currently playing the film festival circuit and can next be seen at The Culver City Film Festival Dec 3rd-9th.

“Other People’s Money” Presents Both Sides of the Moral Question – Director Oliver Muirhead Lets Audiences Decide on the Answer

InterACT Theatre Company will stage the award-winning, provocative comedy, OTHER PEOPLE’S MONEY, at the Pico Playhouse, beginning October 21st.

Dealing with hostile takeovers and the inner workings of corporate America, the play was written by Jerry Sterner who got the idea for the story while working the night-shift for the New York Transit Authority where he managed to write seven plays during the nearly six years he spent working in the booth.

Director, Oliver Muirhead has taken on the controversy that comes with perennial conversations Oliver Muirhead CAPabout corporate takeovers. He is working with two casts to tell this compelling story. The questions are analogous to those presented during every financial crisis since Capitalism began, but Muirhead’s challenge is to stay true to the characters and to both sides of the story that Sterner set out to tell.

Unlike the terms of Blockbuster going at Hollywood Entertainment or Comcast buying Dreamworks Animation, when New England Wire and Cable is threatened by “Larry the Liquidator,” audiences can inspect the moral aspects of the deal so that they are able to take home both sides of the questions being raised. Written in the late 1980’s, this piece rings just as true today. Oliver Muirhead offers a directors perspective on juggling all of those elements.

HR: What was it about this script that sucked you into wanting to direct it? Are you still glad that you took on this job?

Oliver: It’s a great story and a fascinating message, but it was the lives of the characters that made me want to direct the play. The story involves the fate of a whole town and it presents the debate of whether or not it is right to try to hold back change. This electoral season forces us to see how the evolution of the American economy has createdHarner Minault Heins Adler winners and losers, and this play brilliantly asks how we feel about that.

Am I still glad I took on the job? That’s a cruel question for any director to answer one week before opening. But yes, and that’s because working with such talented actors is always a pleasure.

HR: Do you think that good directing comes from good instincts, or is it something that you can learn?

Oliver: Like most jobs, even good directing comes from good instincts…and then you realize how much you have to learn. I guess it’s like the term “practicing medicine,” you’d hope your doctor would have it down by now. But there’s always stuff to learn.

HR: What are your biggest challenges in directing this piece?

Oliver: Too many talented cast members: they get other gigs, they have teaching jobs, and some even have real lives! The scheduling of rehearsals in L.A.‘s intimate theatre scene has always been a huge challenge. AllRob Adler and Robyn Cohen credit goes to Daniel James Clark, our producer, for juggling the actor’s times and conflicts to keep it working in the most efficient way so that we can keep moving forward.

HR: How do you think audiences will relate to the story, and what will stay with them from the experience of having seen this play?

Oliver: It’s what’s happening in the economy right now. The play was written in the 1980’s but the message is even more topical today. The populist rebellions in the U.S and around the world are protests from the victims of progress. Can we stop progress? Should we try to mitigate the damage that comes with economic change? Capitalism is like fire: it warms us but it can badly burn us as well.

HR: Your film credits, like Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me and 2 Broke Girls show that you have a sense of humor. Do you think that humor is one of your strengths as a director?

Oliver: A sense of humor is essential in life, and not just in directing. Without a sense of humor I’d be strapped in a straitjacket or washing downPeterMcDonald JohnTowey AmandaCarlin the Prozac with a tumbler of Jack.

HR: What’s your biggest weakness as a director?

Oliver: Weakness? That’s a sly question. Well, following on from your last question I’d say sometimes I take things a bit too seriously. Lest we forget, it’s a play…we should be playing, and having fun so that we can better entertain people. A play is not a lesson or a lecture. You can go to school for that. Remember, theatre is cheaper and only takes a couple of hours. Another weakness of mine, “I’m a lousy mind reader.” That’s a quote from OTHER PEOPLE’S MONEY. If only I could read minds…

HR: Anything else that you want readers to know about you, this play…or anything?

Oliver: Well, I hope that readers will come and see the play twice…it’s double cast. They will have a wonderfully different experience both times. Other than that, vote. This show is running at the perfect time to make us all think about the important choices we get to weigh in on. Men and women died for our right to vote. Exercise it. Exercise is good for all of us, right? Thank you, it’s been a pleasure.

Other People’s Money opens at 8pm on Friday, October 21st and runs on Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, Sundays at 3pm through November 20, 2016.

The Pico Playhouse is located at 10508 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90064.

Tickets are $32 (Senior & Students $27).

For more information and reservations: 818-765-8732 or online http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2588643

The 10 Worst Movies of 2015

April 1, 2016

Rolling Stone magazine conducted a poll and among their readers and came up with the 10 Worst Movies of 2015.

We agree with all on the list with the exception of “13 Hours.”

See what you think.

Check out the rolling stone article HERE.