2018 Golden Globe Nominees Announced

Hollywood, CA: December 11, 2017

It was a great morning for some in Hollywood today with the announcement of the 2018 Golden Globe Nominations.  The brilliant film, “The Shape of Water” scored the most number of nominations with eight, closely followed by the TV series, “Big Little Lies” which received six.

Some of the most prominent snubs were Michael Stuhlbarg for his moving turn in “Call Me By Your Name,” and directors, Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig who were overlooked for  their films, “Get Out” and “Lady Bird” respectively. Also overlooked was songwriter, Sufjan Stevens, who was snubbed for two powerful songs,  “Mystery of Love” and “Visions of Gideon” from “Call Me By Your Name.”

This has been a banner year for first time nominee, Timothee Chalamet  who scored a Best Actor nod for his lead role in “Call My By Your Name. He can also be seen in the coming-of-age film, “Lady Bird” as well as the western, “Hostiles.”

Some other notable television nominations include the hit show, “Stranger Things” and the compelling British series, “The Crown.”

In most cases the 80 member Hollywood

Timothee Chalamet in “Call Me By Your Name”

Foreign Press Association got it right, but it’s hard to know what they were thinking by nominating Hong Chau for her role in “Downsizing.”  Politics might be a good guess.

 

The 75th annual Golden Globes will take place on January 7, and will be hosted by Seth Meyers.

Here is a fill list of the nominees:

Best Picture – Drama:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Dunkirk”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best Picture – Comedy or Musical:
“The Disaster Artist”
“Get Out”
“The Greatest Showman”
“I, Tonya”
“Lady Bird”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama:
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Tom Hanks, “The Post”
Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama:
Jessica Chastain, “Molly’s Game”
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”
Michelle Williams, “All the Money in the World”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy:
Steve Carell, “Battle of the Sexes”
Ansel Elgort, “Baby Driver”
James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”
Hugh Jackman, “The Greatest Showman”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy:
Judi Dench, “Victoria & Abdul”
Helen Mirren, “The Leisure Seeker”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Emma Stone, “Battle of the Sexes”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture:
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Armie Hammer, “Call Me by Your Name”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture:
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Hong Chau, “Downsizing”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Best Animated Film:
“The Boss Baby”
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco”
“Ferdinand”
“Loving Vincent”

Best Director – Motion Picture:
Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”
Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Christopher Nolan, “Dunkirk”
Ridley Scott, “All The Money in the World”
Steven Spielberg, “The Post”

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture:
Guillermo Del Toro, Vanessa Taylor, “The Shape of Water”
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird”
Liz Hannah, Josh Singer, “The Post”
Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Aaron Sorkin, “Molly’s Game”

Best Original Score – Motion Picture:
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Shape of Water”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“Dunkirk”

 Best Original Song – Motion Picture

“Home,” Ferdinand
“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Remember Me,” Coco
“The Star,” The Star
“This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
“A Fantastic Woman”
“First They Killed My Father”
“In the Fade”
“Loveless”
“The Square”

Best Television Series – Drama:
“The Crown”
“Game of Thrones”
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
“Stranger Things”
“This is Us”

Best Television Series – Comedy:
“Black-ish”
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
“Master of None”
“SMILF”
“Will & Grace”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama:
Jason Bateman, “Ozark”
Sterling K. Brown, “This is Us”
Freddie Highmore, “The Good Doctor”
Bob Odenkirk, “Better Call Saul”
Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama:
Caitriona Balfe, “Outlander”
Claire Foy, “The Crown”
Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce”
Katherine Langford, “13 Reasons Why”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy:
Anthony Anderson, “Black-ish”
Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”
Kevin Bacon, “I Love Dick”
William H. Macy, “Shameless”
Eric McCormack, “Will and Grace”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy:
Pamela Adlon, “Better Things”
Alison Brie, “Glow”
Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Issa Rae, “Insecure”
Frankie Shaw, “SMILF”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:
“Big Little Lies”
“Fargo”
“Feud: Bette and Joan”
“The Sinner”
“Top of the Lake: China Girl”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:
Robert De Niro, “The Wizard of Lies”
Jude Law, “The Young Pope”
Kyle MacLachlan, “Twin Peaks”
Ewan McGregor, “Fargo”
Geoffrey Rush, “Genius”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:
Jessica Biel, “The Sinner”
Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”
Jessica Lange, “Feud: Bette and Joan”
Susan Sarandon, “Feud: Bette and Joan”
Reese Witherspoon, “Big Little Lies”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:
David Harbour, “Stranger Things”
Alfred Molina, “Feud”
Christian Slater, “Mr. Robot”
Alexander Skarsgard, “Big Little Lies”
David Thewlis, “Fargo”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:
Laura Dern, “Big Little Lies”
Ann Dowd, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Chrissy Metz, “This is Us”
Michelle Pfeiffer, “The Wizard of Lies”
Shailene Woodley, “Big Little Lies”

 

Woody Allen Scores with “Blue Jasmine”

JULY 25, 2013

REVIEW by Peter Foldy

Woody Allen’s latest film, BLUE JASMINE, is probably his best work in years.  The movie boasts an impressive Oscar worthy performances from it’s female star, Cate Blanchette who takes on the challenging role of “Jasmine,” a well heeled, New York socialite married to a slick wheeler-dealer named “Hal” (Alec Baldwin) who we soon find blue-jasmineout is cut from the same cloth as Wall Street sociopath, Bernie Madoff.  

Jasmine turns a blind eye to her husbands cheating ways and rarely questions his business ethics, preferring to remain silent in order to keep living the lifestyle to which she feels entitled. But all good things come to an end, and when we first meet Jasmine, it is not as the rich woman of means that she once was, but as a broken, desperate soul moving in with her working class sister, Ginger, (Sally Hawkins) a kind-hearted under-achiever who dates an emotional hot head called “Chilli” (Bobby Cannavele).  Ginger and her two noisy sons live in a cramped San Francisco apartment above a store and you can feel the claustrophobia as soon as you enter the premises.  This surely puts our Jasmine out of sorts.

We soon discover that there are some dents in the sister’s relationship.  Ginger and her ex husband, Augie (a surprisingly impressive Andrew Dice Clay) had invested their lottery winnings with Jasmine’s husband, and he lost it all, destroying Augie and Ginger’s one chance to climb out of the gutter.

Jasmine however is unrepentant as she tries to adjust to this major downshift in her life. She unhappily lands a job as receptionist at a dentist’s office, tries to destroy Ginger’s943535_581150268591833_664076823_n relationship with Chilli, all the while studying to be an interior decorator, a line of work she seems well suited for.  Mostly Jasmine creates havoc, frequently thinking back to what she once was.  It is these flashbacks that allows Blanchette to stretch her talents as both the former and current Jasmine.  We see her at her snootiest as the well-off socialite, throwing dinner parties, indulging in the luxuries that she has mistakenly takes for granted.  We also observe her in present day as she recovers from what seems to be a nervous breakdown, a broke, desperate, humiliated woman trying desperately to hold on to some dignity.

When aspiring congressman, “Dwight” finally comes along, (played by Peter Sarsgaard) Jasmine sees him as her salvation and pulls out all the stops (and all the lies) to be able to get back to the pampered lifestyle that feels entitled to.

Blue Jasmine is an intelligently crafted character study that speaks to the morality of the last decade.  All the performances are exceptional.  Baldwin is at his usual best as “Hal”, and Cannavale is convincing as the rough and tough street hood, “Chilli,” a hood who cries like a baby when his heart breaks.  Hawkins is sympathetic as “Ginger” and Skaarsgard captures wealth and ambition to a T, but it is Blanchette who does the heavy lifting in Blueblue-jasmine-03 Jasmine and her performance is sure to be remembered come award season.

Beautifully shot by Javier Aguirresarobe, the film is one of Woody Allen’s less kinetic presentations, a welcome film for grown-ups in a summer of comic book fodder, Blue Jasmine is well worth a look. We give BLUE JASMINE **** (four stars).

Opens: July 26 (Sony Pictures Classics)
Production: Perdido Productions
Cast: Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett, Louis C.K., Bobby Cannavale, Andrew Dice Clay, Sally Hawkins, Peter Sarsgaard, Michael Stuhlbarg, Tammy Blanchard, Max Casella, Alden Ehrenreich
Director: Woody Allen
Screenwriter: Woody Allen
Producers: Letty Aronson, Stephen Tenenbaum, Edward Walson
Executive producers: Leroy Schechter, Adam B. Stern
Director of photography: Javier Aguirresarobe
Production designer: Santo Loquasto
Costume designer: Suzy Benzinger
Editor: Alisa Lepselter
PG-13 rating, 98 minutes